Hapag-Lloyd - www.youroilandgasnews.com
Hapag-Lloyd connects first ship to shore power
Tuesday, Dec 04, 2012

Connection in US Port of Oakland, California / Initially a total of 15 Hapag-Lloyd ships receive environmentally-friendly technology / Intelligent, flexible solutions retrofitting existing fleet

With the arrival of the “Dallas Express” in the Port of Oakland in California, last weekend, Hapag-Lloyd has for the first time connected one of its ships to shore-based power. Shore Power (also known as “cold-ironing”) is a ship-to-shore connection that provides electri¬cal power to the ship. By using this connection the auxiliary engines normally used to provide power on board can be switched off, reducing diesel and other air pollutant emissions from ships while they are at berth. Other ports around the world are also working on shore-based power systems. The Port of Oakland recently completed installation of the 6,600 volt shore-based power supply after an initial test with Hapag-Lloyd last August. The “Dallas Express” is the first ship to use it now.

“Hapag-Lloyd belongs to the traditional pioneers of maritime environmental protection. Sustainability is a high priority for us, ranging from our routine business to top management. Our initiatives and developments frequently set the standard, often later adopted by others,” states Michael Behrendt, Chairman of the Executive Board of Hapag-Lloyd. “Environmental projects like this in Oakland are especially successful if Port Authority, terminal operator and ship owner work jointly on its implementation. We would like to thank the Port of Oakland for the high level of cooperation.”

In California shore-based power will be mandatory for a certain percentage of ship calls by any particular shipping line from 2014. Hapag-Lloyd is already preparing a total of 15 vessels for the High Voltage Shore Connection (HVSC) of which the “Dallas Express” was the project ship. A 40-foot container is located at the stern of the 4,860-TEU vessel. This contains electrical components and an extendable cable drum for the actual connection to the shore-based source. The drum automatically balances out tidal lift during lay time.

The special container has been jointly developed by Hapag-Lloyd and the Hamburg based company SAM Electronics. The design can be used for the entire fleet, independent of shipboard voltage and the required power of a ship. In the event of a ship changing trade route, or maintenance of the container, the special containers can be swapped.

As part of the Pacific Atlantic Express Service (PAX) the „Dallas Express“ connects 19 ports in North Europe (Hamburg, Rotterdam, Antwerp and Thamesport), North America and Asia. The round trip via Panama Canal takes 98 days.

Source: Hapag-Lloyd

Member Profiles

Featured Profile

Featured White Paper

Featured Case Study

Featured Video